NEW FEATURE- Threatened Species of the Week

by Lucy Hagger

As I generally blog about current biological issues I fancied mixing things up a little and decided I would create a regular feature for my blog. It took me a bit of time to decide what this feature would be, but I decided upon something that interests me and will hopefully interest you readers.

So the plan is that I will be publishing a post each week on a threatened species. This species may be an animal, plant, fungus.. whatever. My main aim is to increase awareness of those threatened species that we rarely hear about.

We are costantly being bombarded with pleas to protect tigers, rhinos, polar bears etc, but these are a mere fraction of the number of species threatened by extinction in our over-polluted and over-populated world.

I will be using the IUCN Redlist to choose threatened species so I’ll give a quick Redlist 101 for those of you unfamiliar with the classification.

So the IUCN Redlist is a list of species that are classified into varying categories depending on how threatened by extinction they are.

So there are 9 categories starting with:
1. Least Concern (LC)
2. Near Threatened (NT)

These two categories do not count as “threatened” and therefore those species classed as LC or NT will not be included in this feature. The following 3 categories describe the varying levels of being threatened by extinction and therefore, species within these 3 categories will be included.
3. Vulnerable (VU)
4. Endangered (EN)
5. Critically Endangered (CR)

There are two categories defining extinct and these are:
6. Extinct in the Wild (EW)
7. Extinct (EX)

Again those species within these categories will not be included as it is unfortunately too late for them.

So I will be looking at those species that fall into the threatened categories of Vulnerable, Endangered and Critically Endangered.

There are 2 other categories as can be seen in the picture, these are Data Deficient (DD) and Not Evaluated (NE). It takes a lot of time and effort to collect enough population data and make an assessment of species and therefore there are an enormous number of species that have not been evaluated or there is not enough data available to accurately categorise. Constant efforts are however in place to get as many species categorised as possible.

So that is all a little dry, but I wanted to make sure we were all clear on the ins and outs of the classification I was using. I look forward to posting my first threatened species very soon!

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